Tear Drops on Flower Buds

Chukwuemerie Udekwe

Blonde Kasie was extremely chubby. He was not an athlete because he could hardly carry his body or run. But unlike his body, Kasie was a boy with a mind that ran - He thought much and sometimes spent hours thinking on what to think. Thus, life as a mystery was not new to him. And he under- stood the journey from womb to tomb as one punctuated with variegated experiences, so frustrating, and piercing. Only that his seemed worse. A boy of twelve, cheeky with nice temperament, Kasie was amiable. But has crammed so much vicissitudes into his young life. After today’s incidence, he could no longer manage the pains, so he scurried home to his mother.

“Mama, why is life so wicked?”

 

Nnedinso stood transfixed, her eyes locked into that of her only child. “Come my son, get a stool for yourself.” She beckoned, knotting her loosed wrapper.

 

“Mama, friends are a betrayal. Ometaburu and others slandered me today.”

 

“What did he say?” Nnedinso lurched forward to hear the troubles of her son.

 

“He told everyone I was having an affair with Chinonyerem, the palm wine tapper’s daughter. Imagine! Am I not too small for that kind of thing?”

 

Nwa m...”

 

“No mama! Don’t start now to pet me. Life has never petted me for once. How about my good name, can I ever regain it again?”

 

“No son. Even if he revokes his words, I still can’t guarantee that. It’s like a broken bottle, a spilled oil. That’s the stupidest thing with backbiting.” “But mama, life is so skew. Nobody even sought my say. They just discussed among themselves and concluded. Is it because I’m younger?”

 

“Kasie, nwayoo. I know it’s difficult, but you must let go.”


“No! Why? It’s my name in question.”

 

“What I can, you cannot see, son. And do not underrate the heart of a mother. After daddy named you, I saw your stars and discovered life would be challenging. That was why I personally named you Sochukwugazom.”

 

“You mean God will save me?”


“Yes.”


O ga-azo m?”


Eeh! O ga-akasikwa gi obi. Cry no more, child.”


“What about Ometaburu and the others, will they pay?”

 

Nwa m, hapu. Asi m gi hapu. You are a flower.”

 

A tear dropped. Just one, on flower buds.